What We Can learn From Baltimore City Ransomware Attack

From WSJ article

On May 7th hackers were able to shut down a number of city of Baltimore computers. They demanded $100k worth of bitcoins to release their stranglehold. On this day that is about 13 Bitcoins (value of Bitcoins fluctuates).

So Baltimore is refusing to pay as they should. The ransomware the hackers used is called RobbinHood.

And apparently if no payment within 10 days the price goes up.  How did RobbinHood get access to the systems (and then corrupt them)?

Bleepingcomputer.com goes into some of the RobbinHood details.

Apparently this ransomware is not coming in through Spam (like many others). Arstechnica has some more details of the IT details in Baltimore City departments:

“Tracking down how and when the malware got into the city’s network is a significant task. The city has a huge attack surface, with 113 subdomains—about a quarter of which are internally hosted—and at least 256 public IP addresses (of which only eight are currently online, thanks to the network shutdown).”

Part of this problem seems to stem out of mismanagement of GRC (Governance, Risk, Compliance).  The IT department was underfunded, which seems obvious now, but was not earlier.  And now the decision is do we pay ransom to get back to normal?  Or suffer through a restore which is an unknown amount of time and resources. Will the restore work? If not, then we have to rebuild systems from scratch. Reinstall operating systems and applications, while also making sure this problem does not resurface (create proper procedures of installing and patching).  So all the things that were obvious in the past and had a long time to resolve, now must be done under the glare of the public eye, in a quick manner. There are plenty of stories of how real estate transactions are not closing without some department computers. So where the city wanted to be paperless, it has to reinstate paper based processes.

Needless to say Baltimore is the poster child of how not to do things.

There is a price to pay at some point for bad management decisions (underfunding IT updates or security initiatives). When you do not update systems in a sprawling campus of hundreds of systems, then it is inevitable that there will be a system that can get attacked. Hackers are ingenious and find ways in. Once they are in, the game is to elevate credentials (privileges).

Let me ask you a question: If it is relatively easy to come in and take a system (for the hacker) then elevating privileges will also be ‘easy’. As privilege escalation vulnerabilities are more numerous.

So now the hacker is in the network and can do pretty much as they please. Now the hacker will try and find the most important systems (email and file servers among others) to infect. This is  exactly what happened in the city of Baltimore campus.

Contact US to discuss GRC and prevent a disaster like this to your organization.

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